Wednesday, November 9, 2011

What Makes A Good Training Partner?

A few weeks ago, I was at the Honbu for a kobudo training event.   We worked weapon applications for about an hour before the group was split up.  Hanshi sent the instructor level students to the first floor to train.  There were six of us on the floor led by two Kyoshi. 

The workout began....

The Kyoshi led us through material at a pace and intensity level I had not practiced at for a long time. 

It was wonderful.

I watched how they trained together.  They were great training partners.  They pushed each other to move faster and conserve movement.  They would stop briefly to answer questions or discuss a movement but would immediately resume the workout with intensity.

I returned to the dojo with a better understanding of what it means to be a good training partner.

In your opinion, what makes a good training partner?

11 comments:

Narda said...

1. Generosity. One that shares all.
2. Sensitivity. One that 'gets it' during drills without having to stop, talk, and have to work at being on the same page.
3. Ego-less. Very difficult to work with people that have ego issues, or worse, a desire to hurt/dominate. Partner becomes competition with those folks.

John Vesia said...

One who approximates your skill level and pushes you to the brink while giving feedback. Someone who attacks/defends with enough realistic intent without being a jerk.

jc said...

trust....

Charles James said...

A human that resonates well with you regardless of level. Synchronicity, the key regardless of the actual person.

With out this it matters not for the disparity results in disparity.

Jim Bercaw said...

1. Enthusiasm -- who wants to train with someone who is not "there"?
2. Consistency of technique -- while working on new technique, a good partner will have the rudimentary skills to put the kick, punch, stance or other strike in the same place, at the same speed, with control, on a consistent basis.
3. Ability to change technique as required -- self defense is based on patterned responses to varied attacks. While learning a new technique, consistency in a training partner is key. To apply those techniques properly requires a training partner who can mix it up

Felicia said...

Trust is a big one to me. I need to know my training partner is going to not only deliver consistent techniques authentically without trying to rip my head off, but that they are there to train for the same reasons I am: to improve/better our understanding. I need to trust that his/her ego will be checked at the door.

Nice post, Michele :-)

Journeyman said...

A basic understanding of how the body would react if the technique was applied for real. Other than that, your commenters have hit on pretty much all the other important bits.

SueC said...

I think we need to make the distinction between a 'nice' training partner i.e. someone we like, feel comfortable training with and who never surprises us or gets us off guard; and a 'good' training partner i.e one who pushes you, makes you a little uncomfortable at times and surprises you with a bit of unpredictability now and again (in a safe way of course).

Nice partners are not always good partners in a martial arts training sense and good partners are not always someone you want to be best friends with. I also think its important to train with a variety of people and not just stick with the tried and trusted 'friend'.

Mathieu said...

It's been a while. Hello Michele. Nice to see you are still training and writing.

Just dropping a note. I'll be back more often. Mat

Michele said...

Thank you for adding to the discussion!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Hercules sport said...

One who approximates your skill level and pushes you to the brink while giving feedback. Someone who attacks/defends with enough realistic intent without being a jerk.
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